Juicy Details of Korean e-Government
Juicy Details of Korean e-Government
  • archivist
  • 승인 2007.11.29 15:16
  • 댓글 0
이 기사를 공유합니다

Since 1987, Korea has made consistent efforts to achieve strategic goals set for e-Government by starting to digitize services related to matters of residence, real estate and vehicles under the National Basic Information Systems Project. The Korea Information Infrastructure (KII) Project for building an information superhighway was also launched in the 1990s, under which each ministry promoted digitization especially in the areas of patents, procurement, customs and national tax. In addition to this, the government selected 11 e-government initiatives, and established common and integrated infrastructure among government agencies including single-window civil services, a comprehensive national procurement system, and a national finance system.

As a result of consistent efforts, the level of informatization reached the advanced stage in terms of its function and ministerial unit, and such areas as civil application, tax, procurement, and customs had begun to be processed electronically, with integrated online services partially provided. Nevertheless, such results had not begun to be felt by citizens due to the supplier-oriented and fragmented nature of informatization projects.

Improving work processes had been underestimated in digitization, while offline-based laws and customs lingered on. In addition, providing seamless onestop services to citizens seemed to confront challenges since information-sharing among government agencies was hindered in part by an unwillingness to share, which led to little contribution to egovernment results as a tool for government innovation. Embracing more expectations for e-government results, the government adopted e-government as a key national agenda in 2003.

Upon his inauguration in 2003, President Roh Moo Hyun prepared policy measures to further develop national informatization and e-government projects promoted by previous administrations. To promote government innovation in a more comprehensive and systematic way, the Presidential Committee on Government Innovation and Decentralization (PCGID) was established to deal with such issues as e-government, administrative reform, local decentralization and tax reform. In 2003, the Roh Administration e-Government Vision and Principles was announced, followed by the e-Government Roadmap. The e-Government Roadmap is composed of four areas of innovation, 10 agendas and 31 projects.

The budget for informatization in 2006 is US$3.4 billion, of which, approximately US$917 million (26.7%) will be invested into e-government implementation and US$9.5 million (2.8%) into narrowing the digital divide. The budget will be allocated, prioritizing the areas that would achieve substantial results such as time saving for work processing, reduction in paper-based documents and savings in administrative and social costs.

The successful implementation of egovernment depends on the performance through each task of the e- Government Roadmap. The e- Government Roadmap projects substantially embody such performance. In an attempt to effectively promote the projects, MOGAHA (Ministry of Government Administration and Home Affairs) established a guideline for project management. It also assigned the NIA to manage the projects, which was the designated body for supporting informatization projects and e-government technology in the former administration. The implementation of e-government has been promoted by two pillars; the e-government support project and the administrative database construction project.

The e-government support project that prioritizes support for Roadmap tasks assists projects involving multiple ministries, new policy projects, or local informatization projects according to the allocated budget and guideline each year. Since 1998, MOGAHA has promoted the exchange of e-documents, along with e-approvals, in order to digitize the entire procedure of document processing in government agencies. As a result of standardization, e-document systems that operated among central government agencies in 2001 were expanded in 2002 to include local governments. E-approvals are currently being undertaken in 58 central agencies and 250 local governments, with the adoption of the edocument standard. The rate of eapprovals in central agencies amounts to 98.2 percent on average as of June 2006.

Meanwhile, statistics on e-document Since 1987, Korea has made consistent efforts to achieve strategic goals set for e-Government by starting to digitize services related to matters of residence, real estate and vehicles under the National Basic Information Systems Project. The Korea Information Infrastructure (KII) Project for building an information superhighway was also launched in the 1990s, under which each ministry promoted digitization especially in the areas of patents, procurement, customs and national tax. In addition to this, the government selected 11 e-government initiatives, and established common and integrated infrastructure among government agencies including single-window civil services, a comprehensive national procurement system, and a national finance system.

As a result of consistent efforts, the level of informatization reached the advanced stage in terms of its function and ministerial unit, and such areas as civil application, tax, procurement, and customs had begun to be processed electronically, with integrated online services partially provided. Nevertheless, such results had not begun to be felt by citizens due to the supplier-oriented and fragmented nature of informatization projects.

Improving work processes had been underestimated in digitization, while offline-based laws and customs lingered on. In addition, providing seamless onestop services to citizens seemed to confront challenges since information-sharing among government agencies was hindered in part by an unwillingness to share, which led to little contribution to egovernment results as a tool for government innovation. Embracing more expectations for e-government results, the government adopted e-government as a key national agenda in 2003.

Upon his inauguration in 2003, President Roh Moo Hyun prepared policy measures to further develop national informatization and e-government projects promoted by previous administrations. To promote government innovation in a more comprehensive and systematic way, the Presidential Committee on Government Innovation and Decentralization (PCGID) was established to deal with such issues as e-government, administrative reform, local decentralization and tax reform. In 2003, the Roh Administration e-Government Vision and Principles was announced, followed by the e-Government Roadmap. The e-Government Roadmap is composed of four areas of innovation, 10 agendas and 31 projects.

The budget for informatization in 2006 is US$3.4 billion, of which, approximately US$917 million (26.7%) will be invested into e-government implementation and US$9.5 million (2.8%) into narrowing the digital divide. The budget will be allocated, prioritizing the areas that would achieve substantial results such as time saving for work processing, reduction in paper-based documents and savings in administrative and social costs.

The successful implementation of egovernment depends on the performance through each task of the e- Government Roadmap. The e- Government Roadmap projects substantially embody such performance. In an attempt to effectively promote the projects, MOGAHA (Ministry of Government Administration and Home Affairs) established a guideline for project management. It also assigned the NIA to manage the projects, which was the designated body for supporting informatization projects and e-government technology in the former administration.

The implementation of e-government has been promoted by two pillars; the e-government support project and the administrative database construction project.

The e-government support project that prioritizes support for Roadmap tasks assists projects involving multiple ministries, new policy projects, or local informatization projects according to the allocated budget and guideline each year. Since 1998, MOGAHA has promoted the exchange of e-documents, along with e-approvals, in order to digitize the entire procedure of document processing in government agencies. As a result of standardization, e-document systems that operated among central government agencies in 2001 were expanded in 2002 to include local governments.

E-approvals are currently being undertaken in 58 central agencies and 250 local governments, with the adoption of the edocument standard. The rate of eapprovals in central agencies amounts to 98.2 percent on average as of June 2006. Meanwhile, statistics on e-documentexchange show that 654 agencies in total have exchanged documents online through the Government e-Document Exchange Center, which includes 58 central agencies, 250 local governments, 198 educational offices and public universities, the National Assembly, and the National Election Commission. The e-document exchange rate among central agencies amounted to 97.3 percent as of June 2006. The high percentage of e-approvals and e-document exchanges shows that electronic document processing has reached the stage of complete stabilization in the government agencies.

All the central agencies are securely exchanging e-documents through the Government e-Document Exchange Center, and they are attempting to expand e-document exchanges to public agencies that have yet to implement e-document systems or use non-standard e-document systems, based on the Information Strategy Planning (ISP) established in 2004. In the initial phase, the e-business Message Service Specification (ebMS), which is an open international standard, was adopted on a pilot basis in the public agencies in 2005. At the same time, the government also introduced an electronic mail box under the center in 2006, through which the agencies having no edocument system or using a non-standard system could also exchange e-documents with government agencies. In the third phase, more than 700 agencies are supposed to use the center in 2007. In addition, a document tracking system connected with the government authentication system will be established to prevent irresponsibility in document delivery. A supporting system for e-document exchange is expected to ensure efficiency, security and reliability in administration, along with a paperless environment, and is to be utilized as a base system in realizing e-government.

Local e-government has begun with the informatization of town county and district administrations since 1998. However, the absence of common and standardized systems in city/province administrations made it difficult for them to share information with lower local governments (town/county/district) without resorting to manual processing. The necessity for the informatization of upper local governments (city/province) bridging central and lower local governments was considered, and the informatization projects were initiated in 2002.

In 2003, the Board of Audit and Inspection (BAI) drew up a plan for innovative auditing operations, aiming at customer satisfaction, and productive and transparent auditing processes in 2003, in order to respond to the changing environment where auditing data was also digitized, performance-oriented management systems established in government agencies, and double-entry bookkeeping was introduced. The e-auditing system is an outcome of the plan, with a view of preventing redundancy in auditing, and ensuring expertise and efficiency with efficient knowledge management. In addition, it also aims at assisting proactive auditing, and performance-oriented auditing with the establishing of a system of data collection, analysis, and assessment by connecting administrative information systems.

MOGAHA established a Real Estate Information Management Center in 2003, with the necessity of integrating real estate related systems independently run by different agencies for increasing efficiency. The center monitors and manages land and building ownership on an annual basis, establishes a system through which comprehensive information can be collected, managed and delivered by connecting real-estate related information of government agencies, and prepares for a new integrated real-estate tax scheme.

BPR/ISP was implemented for efficient connection and management of realestate related information, along with the establishment of the system, and comprehensive real estate information, including actual market prices, housing costs and land value is being provided from 2006. Additionally, an online service system is being constructed to provide real estate statistics information that can be used anytime by the general public, together with analytical information on real estate trade by region, ownership, and trade type based on actual market prices. After 2007, the implementation will aim at providing map-based real estate space analysis by integrating existing real estate data and map data.

The e-Trade services are to support seamless processing of all aspects of trade affairs such as marketing, foreign exchange, customs and logistics. In order to strengthen national competitiveness for export, a new paradigm for trade was required, along with the early establishment of an e-trade platform. The National e-Trade Committee was organized under the chair of the Prime Minister in 2003, in order to enhance etrade projects in an efficient manner, and a master plan for national e-trade was released. Beginning with the establishment of an e-trade document repository, the e-Letter of Credit (e-L/C) Distribution Management System is currently in operation. This project enabled the notice, transfer and buying application of e-L/C as a world first, which resulted in eliminating the need for paper-based L/C, and preventing the loss, damage or forgery of the L/C. The leading 13 domestic banks dealing with foreign exchange participated in this project. An integrated e-Trade platform will be established to consolidate the currently fragmented trade services not only for trading companies but also for related agencies by 2007.

MOGAHA established a one-stop portal (www.open.go.kr) for online administrative information disclosure, through which citizens can request and receive information online without visiting offices. In addition, the agencies where reference lists are connected to one another will be expanded to more than one hundred, including central agencies, local governments and educational offices, and services for easy access to information and immediate browsing upon request will be offered to increase convenience.

By 2007, citizens will have more opportunities to participate in policy-making processes by discussing and exchanging their opinions.


댓글삭제
삭제한 댓글은 다시 복구할 수 없습니다.
그래도 삭제하시겠습니까?
댓글 0
댓글쓰기
계정을 선택하시면 로그인·계정인증을 통해
댓글을 남기실 수 있습니다.

  • #1206, 36-4 Yeouido-dong, Yeongdeungpo-gu, Seoul, Korea(Postal Code 07331)
  • 서울특별시 영등포구 여의도동 36-4 (국제금융로8길 34) / 오륜빌딩 1206호
  • URL: www.koreaittimes.com / m.koreaittimes.com. Editorial Div. 02-578-0434 / 010-2442-9446. Email: info@koreaittimes.com.
  • Publisher: Monica Younsoo Chung. CEO: Lee Kap-soo. Editor: Jung Yeon-jin. Juvenile Protection Manager: Yeon Choul-woong.
  • IT Times Canada: Willow St. Vancouver BC, Canada / 070-7008-0005.
  • Copyright(C) Korea IT Times, Allrights reserved.
ND소프트